Death in the afternoon for Spanish lunch?

by Neil Thomas
November 2nd, 2011

In Spain, long lunches will soon be off the menu.

Recent newspaper reports indicate that if a new campaign to rationalise working hours is successful, traditional long lunches (two hours) might finally be on the way out in Spain, along with the siesta.

This will be a further shock to the many elderly expats who moved there precisely because they saw the siesta as official permission to fall asleep in the afternoon and they resolutely keep up that tradition even if the Spaniards themselves do not. Indeed, for many taking up residence in Spain, it was the one bit of Spanish culture that they felt able to curl up in bed with. They might not have been interested in learning the language, but at least they felt more Spanish in the afternoons.

In these austere times, what further cultural changes will take place?

Does it mean that there will there be no tomorrow for mañana?

(As an aside, a cultural quip if ever there was one, I can remember an amusing observation on this subject: an Irishman was asked whether there was an Irish equivalent to mañana. He replied that there was, but that it was not quite so definite.)

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